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Your Growing Child | Preschool (4 to 5 Years)

your-growing-child-preschool

How much will my child grow?

While all children may grow at a different rate, the following indicate the average for four to five year old boys and girls:

  • weight: average gain of about 4.4 to 6.5 pounds a year
  • height: average growth of about 3 inches per year
  • head size: average growth of about 1 inch per year

What can my child do at this age?

As your child continues to grow, you will notice new and exciting abilities that your child develops. While children may progress at different rates, the following are some of the common milestones children may reach in this age group:


What can my child say?

Speech development in children is very exciting for parents as they watch their children become social beings that can interact with others. While every child develops speech at his/her own rate, the following are some of the common milestones children may reach in this age group:


What does my child understand?

As a child's vocabulary increases, so does his/her understanding and awareness of the world around them. Children at this age begin to understand concepts and can compare abstract ideas. While children may progress at different rates, the following are some of the common milestones children may reach in this age group:


How does my child interact with others?

A very important part of growing up is the ability to interact and socialize with others. This can be a frustrating transition for the parent as children go through different stages, some of which are not always easy to handle. While every child is unique and will develop different personalities, the following are some of the common behavioral traits that may be present in your child:


How to help increase your preschool child's social ability

Consider the following as ways to foster your preschool child's social abilities:

  • offer compliments for good behavior and achievements
  • encourage your child to talk to you and be open with his/her feelings
  • read to your child, sing songs, and talk with him/her
  • spend quality time with your child and show him/her new experiences
  • encourage your child to ask questions and explore
  • encourage physical activity with supervision
  • arrange times for your child to be with other children, such as in play groups
  • give your child the chance to make choices, when appropriate
  • use time-out for behavior that is not acceptable
  • encourage your child to express his/her anger in an appropriate manner
  • limit television watching to one hour a day - use free time for other, more productive, activities