Bullying - what parents should know

online-bullying

With students returning to school, there have already been reports of bullying surfacing in the media, some with tragic results. Fortunately, bullying is not an unsolvable problem. Schools committed to comprehensive programs that address peer abuse have been shown to make a difference.

Youth who are bullied are at risk for physical and mental health consequences that have the potential to last a lifetime. Bullying also has other adverse effects of which you might not be aware.

5 FACTS ABOUT BULLYING YOU MAY NOT REALIZE

  • Youth who bully others are at risk for physical and mental health consequences including depression, anxiety, substance abuse and suicide.
  • Youth who bully others are also at risk for delinquent and criminal behavior.
  • Youth who witness bullying are at risk for depression, anxiety, substance abuse and suicidal thoughts.
  • A study of 5,000 young adults found that bullying has a more detrimental effect on young adult’s mental health when compared to abuse by adults.
  • Bullying based on race, color, national origin, sex, religion or disability is a violation of federal civil rights.

Parents can play a key role in preventing and responding to bullying. Parents of youth who witness bullying, or who bully others, need to be just as invested in the issue as the parents of the victims to work together and help eradicate bullying.

Bullying is a public health problem that requires effort from everyone involved to solve.

Information provided by Marlene Seltzer, M.D., medical director of Beaumont Children’s No Bullying, Live Empowered (NoBLE) program.