MAZE Procedure (for Atrial Fibrillation)

A maze procedure is a surgical treatment for atrial fibrillation that is used to stop an irregular heartbeat and restore a normal heart rhythm. Patients are candidates for a maze procedure if their irregular heartbeat cannot be treated with medication or other nonsurgical approaches.

Doctors at Beaumont Hospital, Troy were the first in Michigan to perform the minimally invasive robotic procedure as a treatment for atrial fibrillation, a prevalent and growing heart rhythm disorder. The new robotic maze procedure is an alternative to open-heart surgery. It's performed through tiny, keyhole incisions with fewer complications and a shorter hospital stay.

"This new robotic maze procedure allows us to correct an electrical irregularity in the heart without having to perform open-heart surgery," says Dr. Robinson. "We don't have to open the patient's chest, stop the heart or place the patient on a heart-lung machine. As a result, patients have fewer complications, less risk of infection, a shorter hospital stay and a quicker recovery."

About the Robotic MAZE Procedure for Atrial Fibrillation

With the robotic maze procedure, the surgeon makes five tiny incisions the size of a dime in the patient's chest, inserting a small endoscopic robotic camera to view the outer surface of the heart. The surgeon sits at a console viewing 3-D images from the robotic camera, while directing robotic arms with their attached surgical instruments. A device is then passed through the tiny incisions to ablate or destroy areas of heart tissue, creating a scar that will block the conduction of abnormal electrical impulses and create a pathway, or maze, for normal electrical signals to travel to the heart's lower chambers (ventricles).

"This procedure combines the specialized skills and expertise of a cardiovascular surgeon and an electrophysiology cardiologist to provide a new treatment option benefitting atrial fibrillation patients," says Dr. Kutinsky.

The robotic maze procedure takes approximately two to three hours to perform. Most patients are able to go home within two to three days after the procedure.

Candidates for the maze procedure include those who cannot tolerate drugs, such as blood thinners; patients whose quality of life is limited by drugs; those who continue to slip into an irregular heart rhythm; and those who cannot have catheter ablation or have had it, but still have atrial fibrillation symptoms.

Other treatments for atrial fibrillation

For most people, slowing heart rate with medications is the most appropriate treatment for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation patients can also be treated with electrical cardioversion (restoring heart rhythm with an electrical shock); radiofrequency ablation (destroying heart tissue with radiofrequency energy); or through traditional open-heart maze procedure. Patients with atrial fibrillation should also take blood thinners to prevent stroke, unless they have a condition that would make use of blood thinners dangerous.

Beaumont is ranked one of the top hospitals in the nation for heart care by U.S. News & World Report's list of "America's Best Hospitals" for heart and heart surgery. The Beaumont Heart & Vascular Center is a comprehensive, state-of-the-art facility that's dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart problems. Beaumont's Ernst Cardiovascular Center has six specialty clinics offering breakthrough surgeries and treatments for people with high-risk heart and vascular conditions including atrial fibrillation, heart valve disease, congestive heart failure, aortic aneurysm and dissections, plus preventive screening.

Health, Wellness & News

Clarence Tabar

Health News

From funerals to fitness, local man saves and strengthens his heart

Cardiac rehab helps him manage his health

Read More
donnellon-watchman

Health News

Stroke prevention treatment improves quality of life and independence for 82-year-old grandmother

The WATCHMAN treatment prevents clots related to a-fib, just as well as blood thinners.

Read More
Lisa Pardington, Dr. Hanzel, John Pardington

Health News

Mother manages grief through advocacy and giving back

The Pardington family has raised nearly $350,000 for the Student Heart Check.

Read More