Ewing Sarcoma Treatment

Specific treatment for Ewing sarcoma will be determined by your physician based on:

  • your age, overall health, and medical history
  • extent of the disease
  • your tolerance of specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • expectations for the course of the disease
  • your opinion or preference

Treatment may include:

  • surgery
  • chemotherapy
  • radiation therapy
  • amputation
  • resections for metastases (e.g., pulmonary resections of cancer cells in the lung)
  • rehabilitation including physical and occupational therapy, and psychosocial adaptation
  • prosthesis fitting and training
  • supportive care (for the side effects of treatment)
  • antibiotics (to prevent and treat infections)
  • continual follow-up care (to determine response to treatment, detect recurrent disease, and manage late effects of treatment)

Long-term outlook for an individual with Ewing sarcoma:

Prognosis for Ewing sarcoma greatly depends on:

  • the extent of the disease
  • the size and location of the tumor
  • presence or absence of metastasis
  • the tumor's response to therapy
  • your age and overall health
  • your tolerance of specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • new developments in treatment

A person who was treated for Ewing sarcoma as a child or adolescent may develop effects months or years after treatment ends. These effects are called late effects. The kind of late effects one develops depends on the location of the tumor and the way it was treated.

Some types of treatment may later affect fertility. If this side effect is permanent, it will cause infertility, or the inability to have children. Both men and women can be affected.

As with any cancer, prognosis and long-term survival can vary greatly from person to person. Every individual is unique and treatment and prognosis is structured around your needs. Prompt medical attention and aggressive therapy are important for the best prognosis. Continuous follow-up care is essential for a person diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma. Late effects of radiation and chemotherapy, as well as second malignancies, can occur in survivors of Ewing sarcoma. New methods are continually being discovered to improve treatment and to decrease side effects.

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