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Symptoms of Testicular Cancer

The following are the most common symptoms for testicular cancer. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) suggests that a man see a physician if any of the following symptoms lasts two weeks or longer:

  • lump in either testicle
  • enlargement of a testicle
  • feeling of heaviness in the scrotum
  • dull ache in the lower abdomen or in the groin
  • sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum
  • pain or discomfort in a testicle or in the scrotum
  • enlargement or tenderness of the breasts

The symptoms of testicular cancer may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis.

Testicular Self-Examination (TSE) Procedure

  • The best time for testicular self-examination is just after a warm bath or shower when the scrotal tissue is more relaxed.
  • While standing in front of a mirror, place the thumbs on the front side of the testicle and support it with the index and middle fingers of both hands.
  • Gently roll the testicle between the fingers and thumbs. Feel for lumps, hardness, or thickness. Compare the feelings in each testicle.
  • If you find a lump, see your physician as soon as possible.

Testicular self-examination is not a substitute for routine physical examinations by your physician.

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